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A wealth of online teaching resources – ON

I’ve been watching the generous outpouring of tips, webinars, workshops, resources from the US and Canada, aimed at helping teachers pivoting to online teaching.

Check out the page of curated resources offered by ecampus Ontario (official name Ontario Online Learning Consortium): Supporting Remote Teaching and Learning During COVID-19. You will find webinar recordings, all kinds of open-licensed resources, and thoughtful dialogues about assessment. Nice to see David Porter (formerly of BCcampus, now representing Humber College) and Giulia Forsythe, Brock University sharing as both educators have an amazing depth and breadth of knowledge related to engaging learners and teaching online.

Like BCcampus open resources, all the materials on this website (unless otherwise noted) are shared under a wide open Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike International 4.0. Kudos to them as sharing with this license encourages others to do the same AND may result in repurposed or improved offerings as we move through the next year or so.

Several of the resources highlighted in the pivot page offer instructors a chance to develop their digital fluencies by digging into the open, self-paced modules that are part of the popular OntarioExtend self-paced, customizable, bilingual, professional learning online series. This series has been on my bucket list for a while as I have watched some of the social media posts that are spawned by enthusiastic participants. If you are lucky you can time your participation to coincide with a facilitated event; one seems to be coming up from Conestoga soon.

Beehive of badges: Ontario Extend

I took a quick dive into Brock University’s Centre for Pedagogical Innovation. Lots of great ideas, resources, teaching and evaluation techniques; I did have to dig a bit for OER but found OER at Brock in the library research guides. As I anticipated, Giulia Forsythe (Special Projects Faciliator and amazing doodler and proponent of open) has been busy helping Brock faculty to produce OER.

You can also check out the Centre’s useful Guide to Teaching and Learning with Technology.

Ontario’s other online teaching resources are neatly organized by Institution and Department thanks to teachonline.ca. If you check out Ontario Faculty & Instructor Training Resources, you’re sure to find something that develops and expands your online teaching skills and confidence.

Thanks to the recent BCcampus newsletter, I’ve discovered a new OER that contains lots of useful examples of how to produce learning content with the amazing tool – H5P! Check out the Catalogue of H5P Content from ecampusOntario.

Lots of help available online and probably within your institution as well. Let me know if I missed something your college or university is offering to help instructors during this challenging time (contact me sylvia r at educomm dot ca)

The fruits of BC’s focus on “open”

fruit ripeningHave you been following the development of open textbooks on the BCcampus OpenEd Resources site – https://open.bccampus.ca/?

If you visit the website, you’ll find some exciting statistics about the amount of money saved by students, the number of textbooks created and adopted, the progress made in funding the development of ancillary resources. You can learn more by reviewing Dr. Tony Bates blog post “Acorns to oaks? British Columbia continues its progress with OERs

While I’ve been appreciative of the efforts of the Open Textbooks project I’ve been far more impressed with their efforts to develop a broader understanding (and integration) of the “open” approach through their events and workshops, and the support of various special groups that pursue a particular aspect of OERs (eg, librarians, instructional designers, educational technologists).

I was particularly impressed with Lauri Aesoph’s decision to “walk the talk” by making the development of the popular guides:

BC Open Textbook Adaptation Guide

BC Open Textbook Pressbooks Guide

visible and transparent by posting, in the Pressbook for each guide under development, a page that lists the dates and progress of various sections. AND she’s going to cc-license the “in process” material as well as the final version – very gutsy but definitely in keeping with the spirit of “open” I admire.

While the cautious side of my personality looks ahead and sees the potential chaos if people see too many “warts” in an open development project (i.e., lack of trust in the final product), the side that has always been thrilled by the possibilities of crowdsourcing and open learning/education/development approaches, applauds Lauri’s “big sky” thinking “A New Future for Open Textbooks” at the end of her blog post “From Transparent to Invisible: Open Creations

What I see missing is a way for people to connect with each Pressbooks project and to volunteer to contribute or to report back whatever they take and use or repurpose. The shareback step seems to always be forgotten (cuz it’s hardest maybe). But kudos to Lauri and BCcampus.

You go grrrl!

 

 

Find Resources – Open Washington: Open Educational Resources Network

We’ve broken down these resources with the intent of making the search process more efficient and effective. For each you’ll find a list of unique traits, licensing information, and an example of how to attribute the source

Source: Find Resources – Open Washington: Open Educational Resources Network

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